The 5-Question [Writer] Interview: Kim Hooper

by Meredith Resnick

The writer thinks about intention, chronological order and connection to a story.

Emerging voice Kim Hooper earned her masters in professional writing from USC, and is a senior level copywriter for a large advertising agency (you’ve seen her work on popular brands, believe me!). She recently completed her first novel and is at work on a second, and contemplating next steps for her work. She’s been writing stories since she was seven or eight years old, many of which her mother still has somewhere in a box, she says. For childhood birthdays, Kim used to request baby name books, which she would use to name her characters. “I’ve also kept a journal since I was six. It’s electronic now, but there are about 20-30 hardcovers, with keys, in fireproof safes at my parents’ house,” Kim says.

 

The Writer’s Journey: Do you plot your novels or do they take you on a “meandering” path? Tell us the good, the bad and the everything.

Kim: My novels always start with one line. I just get a line in my head. I have a book with a collection of these lines. For some reason, some resonate with me more than others and I just start writing to see where the line takes me. After about twenty pages or so, as I get to know the characters, I start thinking, Is this a short story? A novel? That’s when I give some thought to overall plot. I think about where I want the characters to go, how I want them to interact. Still, even when I develop a rough outline, there are lots of holes and gaps that are very much intended. I find the most interesting twists and turns when the plot is not set in stone. I don’t like to meander too much, but I think it’s very powerful to just see where the story goes. It’s pretty obvious when it goes way off course.

The Writer’s Journey: Do you see your work as a huge mural or do the pieces emerge one color, one notion, one word at a time?

Kim: I start small, with one line in my head (a little birdie, I guess you could say). Even when the bird flies away and an entire sky is revealed, I still fixate on the minor details of the landscape. It’s too overwhelming for me to think about “the big picture” when I write. I may have a very general idea of it in my head, but I like to figure out characters and plot points as I go. It’s more exciting that way. In terms of career, I am definitely the same way. I dream about how I want my career to shape up, but I take one little story or novel at a time, without much expectation placed on it. I try to think of it the way I did when I was a kid, before I knew there was such a thing as a publishing industry. I try to remember that it’s pure joy to start with one line and see where it takes me.

The Writer’s Journey: [I love this question so I tend to ask it often of different people.]The child development writer Joseph Chilton Pearce said: “To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong.” When you write are there “rights” and “wrongs” for you?

Kim: I’ve definitely struggled to let go of the fear of being wrong. Now that I’m trying to get my first novel published, I’m second-guessing other in-process projects: “Is this character too similar to the other one? Is the tone too familiar? Should I use first person again?” I assume there is a system of rules to follow, when really there is not. When working on a novel, I feel like I have to write scenes in chronological order, even if a scene later on in the story is begging me to write it. It really is a challenge for me to think of writing as I did when I was younger—just fun. When I am able to see it that way, without rules and “rights and wrongs,” I write better.

The Writer’s Journey: How do you connect with your work, your voice best? What works?

Kim: Lately, I start writing by hand, with mechanical pencil, on blank pages of computer paper. I have no idea why. I’ve always liked to start by hand, but the pencil on blank paper is new. As hokey as it sounds, I feel more connected to the story when I write long-hand. It’s not always practical though, as my wrist gets very sore. I go to the computer once I feel like I’m in a groove with the characters and the plot. If I get stuck, I come back to long-hand. After I have everything typed up, I print it out and go to town with more long-hand edits—sometimes, pages and pages of them.

The Writer’s Journey: Is writing your only art? Your main one? Do you use other methods to access the creative well?

Kim: Sadly, I’m not very creative otherwise. I used to be much more crafty, but now any creative energy I get tends to go toward writing. However, I am very creative when it comes to making ready-made meals from the store appear homemade.

Kim lives in the [says her] not-too-inspiring suburbs of Irvine, CA where, aside from reading voraciously and watching movies (also voraciously), she doesn’t really have hobbies. “I’m a pretty dull person, in fact. I have two cats, to complete the writer stereotype.” Visit her awesome Writing By Day/Writing By Night website here.

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Alexandra

It’s always interesting to read about the journey taken by another writer and compare with one’s own. I will look forward to reading Kim’s novel.

Sarah Henry

Intrigued by the author’s comment that she feels more connected to a story she writes in longhand. Fascinating.

Kristen

Like Sarah, I’m also interested in her technique of pen to paper. I think there’s definitely something to that. My teenager enjoys writing and always starts by putting it in a journal first, then types it into the computer.

Vera Marie Badertscher

I never could get the hang of fiction writing, and find it fascinating to hear about a fiction writers method. Like her concept of leaving holes in the outline to see what will develop. (I feel more creative writing in longhand, also.)

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